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Master of Science in Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine Degree Program

 

(Austin and San Antonio Campuses)

 

msaom-chop

The Purpose of the Master of Science in Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine Program is: 

To contribute to the health, welfare and public good of the people of Texas and the United States by providing a highly trained and professionally motivated cadre of health care specialists, schooled in the healing principles of Traditional Chinese Medicine, thousands of years in development and perfection.

Educational Objectives

Graduates of this program will be qualified to meet the challenges of establishing and maintaining a successful profession in the 21st century, as evidenced by the following learning outcomes:

  • A systematic knowledge of the theories, philosophies, and practices of Traditional Chinese Medicine including a thorough grounding in the Chinese medical classics;
  • The skills to assess patients and make an accurate TCM diagnosis and effective treatment plan;
  • The ability to formulate treatment plans for the application of acupuncture and Chinese herbs based upon the total assessment of the patient;
  • The skill to communicate accurately and effectively with other health care providers and appropriately refer patients to them;
  • The ability to communicate professionally with academic, inter-disciplinary, and business leaders, industry, patients and the public with empathy, compassion, and integrity;
  • The successful placement of graduates in a practice of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine, and the competence to effectively and ethically manage the business aspects of a clinical practice.

 

Admission Requirements 

 

The University desires for standard admission those applicants who have completed a bachelor’s degree or its equivalent from a U.S. Department of Education approved accredited institution, with a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale.

Candidates may also be admitted based upon the Admissions Committee determination that the applicant demonstrates suitability for graduate level study of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine and has successfully completed a minimum of 60 semester credits (or equivalent quarter credits), applicable toward a baccalaureate degree.  Candidates who enter the program without a bachelor degree may be dually enrolled in the Master of Science in Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine program and the Bachelor of Science in Traditional Chinese Medicine (description elsewhere in this catalog).  The baccalaureate degree will be awarded when the requirements for that degree have been fulfilled.

Enrolling with a minimum of 60 semester credits will require the completion of general education courses with a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale.  General education requirements are defined as those areas of learning which are the common experience of all educated persons, including subject matter from the humanities, mathematics and the sciences, and the social sciences.

Thirty six (36) of the minimum 60 semester credits must be in these areas.  Note that courses within the area of concentration of the subject matter of the program shall not be considered general education courses. The remaining 24 credits can be in any other field of study as long as they are not remedial.

HumanitiesCourses in fields such as literature, philosophy, logic, foreign language, art, music appreciation, and communications, including rhetoric, composition, and speech; but excluding business communications, spelling, letter writing, and word study.
Mathematics and the SciencesCourses such as biology, chemistry, physics, geology, astronomy, and mathematics theory and analysis, including algebra, trigonometry, geometry, calculus, and other advanced mathematics courses, but excluding business mathematics and basic computations.
Social SciencesCourses such as history, economics, political science, geography, sociology, anthropology, and general psychology, but excluding courses such as practical psychology, selling techniques and social or business behavior.
Other CoursesCourses accepted in this category can be from any field as long as they are not remedial. They must equal 24 credits.

 

Admission Procedure for U.S. Students

 

The application for admission and all associated documentation should arrive at the University at least 21 days before the first day of class (see Academic Calendar in this catalog). Applicants are considered on the basis of individual merit, without regard to gender, age, religion, creed, race, ethnic origin or disabling conditions. This policy applies to all matters within the University.

Prospective students must submit the following:

  1. A completed application form.
  2. A copy of applicant’s birth certificate or current driver’s license/identification card.
  3. Copies of official transcript(s); photocopies cannot be accepted. Transcripts must be mailed to the University directly from the registrar’s office of the institution(s) where credit was earned.
  4. Copies of licenses or certificates in the healing arts, if any (required of applicants to the College of Traditional Chinese Medicine).
  5. Two full-face, passport-sized photographs.
  6. An application fee payable to the Texas Health and Science University as outlined for each program. This fee is non-refundable.
  7. A letter of interest from the applicant, explaining why he/she desires to attend the Texas Health and Science University.
  8. Telephone or personal interview with the Academic Dean or other official of the University.
  9. Two letters of reference.
  10. An evaluation of any foreign credentials showing equivalency to the educational system of the United States.  All foreign credentials must be evaluated by a credential service that is a member of the National Association of Credential Evaluation Services (NACES).  All credentials submitted to the University are retained by the University.

Upon acceptance into the program, the student must sign and return the enrollment agreements and schedule a time for registration, at which time the plan of study will be discussed.

Admission Procedure for International Students

 

All international students are required to adhere to the regulations of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. University procedures and regulations for non-U.S. citizens must also comply with federal law; therefore, admission requirements for international students, including permanent residents, differ from those for United States citizens.  All foreign credentials must be evaluated by a credential service that is a member of the National Association of Credential Evaluation Services (NACES).  All credentials submitted to the University are retained by the University.

Admission of an international student to the University requires the following documents.  The University will issue an I-20 upon receipt of:

  1. A non-refundable application fee of $150.00 (USD) and a $200.00 (USD) fee for the evaluation of credentials, transcripts, and other overseas documents.
  2. A completed application for admission.
  3. One (1) official transcript in English translation sufficient to establish the completion of the equivalent of at least 60 semester credits at the undergraduate level; such transcripts must be mailed to the University from the institutions where the coursework was completed.  If the official transcript is not available in English, contact the Admissions Coordinator for further assistance.
  4. Proof of sufficient financial resources for educational and personal expenses.
  5. Proof of English language competency.  A student may be accepted into the program if he or she satisfies one of the following indicators:
  • Speaks English as his or her official or native language.
  • Graduates from a U.S.-accredited high school.
  • Transfers from or holds a degree from an institution accredited by an agency recognized by the U.S. Department of Education or from an English language institution in another country.
  • TOEFL English language proficiency iBT score of 80 of higher (speaking 26) or IELTS score of 6.5 or higher (speaking 8.0).

 

Additional Requirements for Admission to the Dual Master’s Degree

 All students must be first accepted by THSU before enrolling in the Dual Degree program. The Dual Degree program is administered jointly by THSU and International Education College (IEC), Zhejiang Chinese Medical University, Zhejiang, China.  Dual Degree candidates must be non-Chinese citizens holding a passport from any nation other than China, Taiwan, Hong Kong or Macau.

 

Transfer of Credit

 

Texas Health and Science University will accept academic credits earned at other accredited institutions and consider the award of course credit toward the University’s Master of Science in Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine degree according to the following guidelines:

  1. Limitations on the transferability of credits may apply. Credit in the Master of Science in Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine degree may be awarded for past coursework completed at institutions accredited by the Accreditation Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine (ACAOM) or by any other recognized governmental accrediting authority or a regional accrediting agency authorized by the U.S. Department of Education. Student performance in the coursework to be transferred will be evaluated in terms of equivalent subject(s) offered by the University.  Coursework to be considered for transfer will have been completed within ten (10) years of the date of application, with applicant receiving a grade of “C” or better.
  1. In order to receive transfer credit, the student must request a transcript review in writing within the first trimester of attendance. Request forms are available from the Registrar.
  1. The entire record of the evaluation and award of transfer credit will be included in the student’s academic file and made an official part of the student’s THSU transcript annotated with “TC” but will not be used to calculate the student’s GPA. For each credit reviewed and approved for transfer, a fee will apply.

 

  1. The maximum permissible number of transfer credits into the master degree program is limited to one-half or fewer of the credits required for the master’s degree.

Transferring Credits To Other Institutions

The transferability of credits you earn at THSU is at the complete discretion of an institution to which you may seek to transfer.  Acceptance of the degree you earn in your program is also at the complete discretion of the institution to which you may seek to transfer.

 

Curriculum

Master of Science in Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine

(First Professional Degree)

Texas Health and Science University is accredited by the Accreditation Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine (ACAOM) to award the degree of Master of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine with a major in Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine. This program prepares graduates to pass their national board exams and become a Licensed Acupuncturist.  The suggested schedule of study may be completed in ten trimesters (40 weeks).  Students must complete the coursework and required internship for this degree within 15 trimesters.

Course CodesCourse NamesSemester CreditsContact Hours
First Trimester
A-4101Fundamental Theories of Traditional Chinese Medicine460
A-4102Chinese Terminology and Phonetics230
A-4103Meridian Theory230
W-4101Anatomy and Physiology I345
A-4104Introduction to Point Location115
A-4105Point Location – Green345
 Total First Trimester15225
Second Trimester
A-4106Introduction to TCM Diagnosis460
W-4102Biomedical Concepts, Terminology and Western Medical History230
A-4107Point Location – Yellow460
W-4103Anatomy and Physiology II230
H-4101Introduction to TCM Herbology115
H-4102TCM Herbology – Yellow230
A-4108TCM Diagnosis I230
 Total Second Trimester17255
Third Trimester
A-4109Qi Exercise115
A-4110Special Acupuncture Techniques230
A-4111Five Element Theory and Application115
A-4112CPR and Other Emergency Techniques115
C-4101Clinic Observation – Black390
E-4101Medical Ethics115
H-4103TCM Herbology – Green345
A-4113Point Location – Red115
A-4114TCM Diagnosis II230
 Total Third Trimester15270
Fourth Trimester
W-4201Surface Anatomy230
A-4201Meridian Acupoint Energetics and Application345
C-4201Clinic Observation – White390
E-4201Marketing and Office Management345
A-4202Practical Training in Diagnosis230
H-4201TCM Herbology – Red345
 Total Fourth Trimester16285
Fifth Trimester
E-5202Counseling and Communications230
E-5203Business Planning and Entrepreneurship230
H-5202Introduction to TCM Prescriptionology115
A-5203Treatment Modality of Acupuncture I345
C-5202Clinic Internship I4120
H-5203TCM Prescriptionology – Orange230
A-5204Scalp and Ear Acupuncture230
 Total Fifth Trimester16300
Sixth Trimester
W-5202Biomedical Pathophysiology345
H-5204TCM Prescriptionology – Blue230
A-5205Treatment Modality of Acupuncture II345
C-5203Clinic Internship II4120
W-5203Biomedical Diagnosis and Laboratory Tests345
 Total Sixth Trimester15285
Seventh Trimester
W-5301Biomedical Microbiology345
A-5301Tui Na230
W-5302Diet and Nutrition115
W-5303Case Management and Referral230
H-5301TCM Prescriptionology – Purple345
C-5301Clinic Internship III4120
 Total Seventh Trimester15285
Eighth Trimester
H-6302Classics I:  Shang Han Lun230
W-6304Biomedical Pharmacology345
H-6303Clinical Patent Herbs115
H-6304Practical Training in Herbal Formulation115
H-6305Internal Medicine – Herbology345
A-6302Licensure Examination Preparation: Foundations of TCM230
C-6302Clinic Internship IV4120
 Total Eighth Trimester16300
Ninth Trimester
H-6306TCM Gynecology230
W-6305Clinical Sciences and Clinical Medicine230
H-6307Classics II:  Golden Chamber115
A-6303Licensure Examination Preparation:  Acupuncture and Point Location230
H-6308Licensure Examination Preparation:  Herbology345
W-6306Biomedical Toxicology230
C-6303Clinic Internship V4120
 Total Ninth Trimester16300
Tenth Trimester
W-6401Biomedicine Review345
W-6402Hygiene, Public Health and Epidemiology115
H-6401Classics IV:  Wen Bing Lun115
H-6402Classics III:  Four Streams of Scholars (Jin Yuan Dynasty)115
C-6401Clinic Internship VI4120
W-6403Biomedical Research Design and Scientific Method230
 Total Tenth Trimester12240
TOTAL 1532745

THSU follows the semester credit system:  15 contact hours plus 30 hours of out-of-class work equals one classroom credit, and 30 contact hours plus 15 hours of out-of-class work equals one clinic (lab) credit.

Elective Courses

Students are also encouraged to take one or more concentration courses which are specialties within Traditional Chinese Medicine.

Electives   
O-5001Tai Chi:  108 Wu Tai Chi Chuan 11 15
O-5002Tai Chi:  108 Wu Tai Chi Chuan 2115
O-6003TCM Pediatrics230
O-6004TCM Neurology230
O-6005TCM Dermatology230
O-6006TCM Facial Rejuvenation115
O-6007TCM for Side Effects of Western Medicine230
O-6008TCM Sports Medicine230
O-6009TCM Geriatrics115
O-6010TCM for Modern Conditions230
O-6011Fluid Physiology and Pathology230

 

Course Numbering System

The course number consists of the department designation, academic level, year in the program, and course sequence.

Maximum Academic Course Load

Students are considered full-time if registered for at least 15 semester credit hours. Students enrolled in this program may not register for more than 17 credits in any given trimester.  Any exceptions must be submitted by the student to the Department Director, Academic Dean, and Senior Administrator for approval.

Maximum Classroom Size

 

The maximum number of students in a typical classroom at either campus is 24.  The maximum number of students in a typical clinic setting at either campus is 8.

 

Second Year Comprehensive Examination

 

At the end of their second year of study or sixth consecutive trimester of enrollment, all MSAOM students are required to take a written exam.  The academic department uses the exam results to assess students’ readiness for the national certification exams and to assess the Satisfactory Academic Progress of second year students.  Refusal to take and/or failure on the exam may hinder the continued enrollment of the student in the program.  Students will have two (2) chances to take and pass the Second Year Exam.  The fee for the Second Year Comprehensive Exam is $50.00.

Graduation Requirements

 

All candidates for graduation from the master’s degree program must complete their studies within 15 attempted trimesters, with a Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) of at least a 2.5 on a 4.0 scale. The following minimum requirements must be completed to receive the Master of Science in Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine degree:

 

Acupuncture and related didactic studies  49 credits
Biomedical didactic studies (western medical science)  34 credits
Herbal didactic studies  32 credits
Clinical training  30 credits
Ethics, Business and Communications didactic studies    8 credits
Total153 credits

This is the suggested course of study.  However, unless a prerequisite course is specified, a student may take several courses in a different order.

The completion designation is Master of Science in Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine, with a major in Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine.

Licensure Requirements for the State of Texas

 

Information on licensure requirements is available under Texas Medical Board Rules Chapter 183, Procedural Rules for Licensure Applicants, located at http://www.tmb.state.tx.us/rules/rules/bdrules.php. The following is paraphrased from that rule. Admission candidates are encouraged to read the entire rule and licensure information at http://www.tmb.state.tx.us/page/acupuncturist-licensing-overview . The applicant must:

  • Be at least 21 years of age;
  • Submit an application online for licensure and pay the $320 application fee;
  • Complete 60 credits of general academic college courses, other than in an acupuncture school, that are not remedial;
  • Complete 1,800 clock hours of Acupuncture training from an accredited acupuncture      school;
  • Complete 450 clock hours of the required 1,800 clock hours in herbal training;
  • Graduate from an accredited acupuncture school;
  • Take and pass all modules of the NCCAOM examination within 5 attempts;
  • Take and pass the CCAOM Clean Needle Technique Course and Practical          Examination;
  • Take and pass the jurisprudence examination and pay the $61 fee.

A temporary license may be issued prior to the meeting of the Acupuncture Board upon completion of the application process.

Temporary licenses are issued at the discretion of the Executive Director and are valid for 100 days. In addition a 30-day extension may be requested if necessary.

There is a processing fee of $107 for a temporary license. This fee must be paid in addition to the application-processing fee of $320.

NCCAOM Certification Information

 

Texas Health and Science University assists its students with test preparation and offers study materials in the library geared specifically towards this purpose.  Detailed information on the NCCAOM certification examinations may be located at: http://www.nccaom.org/   Students must pass exams required for licensure in the state in which they plan to practice, prior to starting their practice.  Students are urged to plan to take certification exams during their third year in the program, as experience has shown that those who do are more successful in passing the exams.  The Oriental Medicine (OM) Certification Application and four exam modules required for licensure in Texas currently cost $1,795.

 

Course Descriptions

Acupuncture Courses

A-4101   Fundamental Theories of Traditional Chinese Medicine

This course includes a brief introduction to the historical background and evolution of Traditional Chinese Medicine. This course mainly introduces the theories of Yin and Yang, the Five Elements, Zang Fu, Qi, Blood, Body Fluid, Etiology, Pathogenesis, and General Rules of Prevention and Treatment.

4 credits:  Prerequisites: None.

 

A-4102 Chinese Terminology and Phonetics

This course is an introduction to the Chinese characters and Pinyin words necessary to understand the curriculum, to assure correct pronunciation, and to enable the study of the existing body of Traditional Chinese Medicine literature and available texts.

2 credits, Prerequisites: None.

A-4103   Meridian Theory

This course covers the basic concept of the meridians, with a focus on the 12 regular meridians and the eight extra meridians.  It will also cover the 12 divergent meridians, 12 muscle regions, 12 cutaneous regions and 15 collaterals.

2 credits, Prerequisites: None.

 

A-4104   Introduction to Point Location

This is an introductory course in which students will learn the concept, classification and measurement methods of acupoints. Students will also learn the basic concepts of specific acupoints.

1 credit, Prerequisites: None.

A-4105   Point Location – Green

This course is the first of a three-trimester study of the acupuncture points of the 14 meridians and selected extra points. Chinese point names, comparative review of locations based on traditional and modern anatomy, therapeutic indications, treatment methods utilizing acupuncture and moxibustion, and point selection by differential diagnosis of conditions will be discussed for each point. This first trimester will focus on the Lung meridian of hand Taiyin, Large Intestine meridian of hand Yangming, Stomach meridian of foot Yangming, Spleen meridian of foot Taiyin, Heart meridian of hand Shaoyin and Small Intestine meridian of hand Taiyang.

3 credits, Prerequisites: A-4104.

 

A-4106   Introduction to TCM Diagnosis

This course introduces the classic methods of diagnosis of Traditional Chinese Medicine: inspection, auscultation and olfaction, inquiry and palpation. This course also emphasis how to combine the Four Diagnostic Methods to obtain a comprehensive and systematic understanding of the condition of disease.

4 credits, Prerequisites: None.

 

A-4107   Point Location – Yellow

This course continues the study of the acupuncture points of the 14 meridians and selected extra points. Chinese point names, comparative review of locations based on traditional and modern anatomy, therapeutic indications, treatment methods utilizing acupuncture and moxibustion, and point selection by differential diagnosis of conditions will be discussed for each point. This course will focus on the Urinary Bladder meridian of foot Taiyang, Kidney meridian of foot Shaoyin, Pericardium meridian of hand Jueyin, San Jiao meridian of hand Shaoyang, Gallbladder meridian of foot Shaoyang and Liver meridian of foot Jueyin.

4 credits, Prerequisites: A-4104.

 

A-4108   TCM Diagnosis I 

This course continues the discussion of the classical methods of Traditional Chinese Medicine diagnosis and focuses on differentiation according to the Eight Principles, Qi, Blood, Phlegm, Stagnation, and the theory of Zang Fu.

2 credits, Prerequisites:  A-4106.

 

A-4109   Qi Exercise

This course includes an introduction to the philosophy and principles of Qi Gong and Tai Chi, and application of the relationship of Qi Exercise to health, wellbeing, meditation, self-awareness, relaxation, balance and harmony. Basic Qi Gong and Tai Chi patterns and techniques will be taught.

1 credit, Prerequisites: None.

 

A-4110   Special Acupuncture Techniques

These techniques include such needling methods as the filiform needle, cutaneous needle, electrical stimulation, moxibustion, and other methods.  Academic familiarization with these techniques, with limited simulated application of the techniques will be applied in a classroom setting only.

2 credits, Prerequisites: A-4101.

 

A-4111   Five Element Theory and Application

This is an in-depth discussion of the theory of the Five Elements and their application in diagnosis and treatment. Students will associate points on the channels that correspond to specific elements.

1 credit, Prerequisites: None

 

A-4112   CPR and Other Emergency Techniques

Part I (classes 1, 2 and 3) cover the management of emergency situations specific to an acupuncture practice.  Part II (classes 4 and 5) are taught by an American Red Cross certified instructor and will cover the management of heart and breathing emergencies, along with instruction in first aid.

1 credit, Prerequisites: None.

 

A-4113   Point Location – Red

Students determine the location of acupuncture points (numbering about 365 major points and 50 extra points) using anatomical landmarks and the proportional body measurement system. Subject matter addressed in this course includes the following channels: Ren, Du, and Extraordinary Points.

1 credit, Prerequisites: 4104.

 

A-4114 TCM Diagnosis II 

This course continues the discussion of the different systems by which TCM differentiates syndromes, with an emphasis on etiology, the eight principles and theory of Zang Fu.  Also includes the theories of wei qi, ying xue, meridians and collaterals, san jiao and six meridians.

2 credits, Prerequisites:  A-4106, A-4108.

 

A-4201   Meridian Acupoint Energetics and Application

Focusing on the indications and energetics of the 12 regular meridians, the course also covers the application of points in the treatment of disease. An in-depth discussion of energetic points includes Five Shu, Yuan, Luo, Xi, Shu, Mu, the Eights (confluent and influential), 13 Ghost and emergency aid points applied in the treatment of disease according to the principles of Traditional Chinese Medicine.

3 credits, Prerequisites: A-4104, A-4105, A-4107, A-4113, A-4114.

 

A-4202   Practical Training in Diagnosis 

Students will further refine their pulse and tongue diagnosis skills under the assistance and guidance of the instructor.

2 credits, Prerequisites: A-4106, A-4108, A-4114.

 

A-5203   Treatment Modality of Acupuncture I

This is a discussion of and approach to each internal disease from the Traditional Chinese Medicine perspective, with emphasis on acupuncture treatment. The course involves in-depth discussion of etiology, pathogenesis, and differentiation of syndromes, diagnosis and treatment with acupuncture according to the principles of Traditional Chinese Medicine.

3 credits, Prerequisites: A-4104, A-4105, A-4107, A-4113, A-4114, A-4201.

 

A-5204   Scalp and Ear Acupuncture

According to Traditional Chinese Medicine principles, scalp acupuncture techniques are most effective for treating afflictions such as stroke, movement hindrance and certain neurological problems. Point measurement and location, and needle stimulation skills will be introduced. Students will also study the physical surface of the ear to locate acupuncture points on the various auricular surfaces. The physiological links between the points and the internal organs will be presented. Ear acupuncture in the treatment of alcoholism, drug abuse and weight loss will be discussed.

2 credits, Prerequisites:  A-4103.

 

A-5205   Treatment Modality of Acupuncture II

This is a continuation of the discussion of each internal disease from the Traditional Chinese Medicine perspective, with emphasis on acupuncture treatment. The course involves in-depth discussion of etiology, pathogenesis, and differentiation of syndromes, diagnosis and treatment with acupuncture.

3 credits, Prerequisites: A-5203.

 

A-5301   Tui Na

This class covers traditional methods of Oriental manual therapy and the use of this therapy in accordance with the principles of Traditional Chinese Medicine.  Channel palpation, body mechanics, indications and contraindications for Tui Na techniques are also covered.

2 credits, Prerequisites:  A-4103.

 

A-6302   Licensure Examination Preparation: Foundations of TCM

This course prepares the student for success on the Foundations of Oriental Medicine certification examination by rigorously reviewing and testing the student’s knowledge base of TCM principles, modes of diagnosis, and treatment strategies. The student will identify areas of weakness in order to more efficiently conduct their exam preparation, and will learn effective test-taking strategies utilizing critical thinking skills. This course focuses on the specific areas of study recommended in the NCCAOM candidate handbook.

2 credits, Prerequisites: A-5203, A-5205.

 

A-6303   Licensure Examination Preparation: Acupuncture and Point Location

Students will review the entire program of acupuncture studies, focusing on the specific areas of study recommended in the national exam preparation handbook for the Acupuncture and Point Location module.

2 credits, Prerequisites:  A-5203, A-5205.

 

Biomedical Sciences (Western Medical Science)

 

W-4101   Anatomy and Physiology I

Students study the structures and functions of the human body and learn the basic principles of homeostasis in the internal environment.  In this course, basic concepts of metabolism and regulation are applied to the study of the following systems:  cellular, tissue, integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, and endocrine systems.

3 credits, Prerequisites:  None.

 

W-4102   Biomedical Concepts, Terminology and Western Medical History

This survey course introduces the historical development of medicine in the West, to familiarize students with the systems of medicine practiced by M.D.’s, D.C.’s, and D.O.’s. Emphasis will be placed on teaching students the use and meaning of terminology and technical vocabularies necessary for professional, inter-disciplinary communications.

2 credits, Prerequisites: None.

 

W-4103   Anatomy and Physiology II

Students study the structure and functions of the human body and learn the basic principles of homeostasis in the internal environment.  In this course, basic concepts of metabolism and regulation are applied to the study of the following systems:  endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems.

2 credits, Prerequisites:  W-4101.

 

W-4201   Surface Anatomy

This biomedical anatomy course focuses on the superficial features of the body, such as tendons and muscles and bony landmarks, with a view to the identification and use of anatomical landmarks as aids in locating underlying tissues and organs.

2 credits, Prerequisites: W-4101.

 

W-5202   Biomedical Pathophysiology

This course covers the pathological conditions that may affect the respiratory, circulatory, digestive, musculoskeletal, neurological, and other systems of the body. Understanding such disease processes helps the practitioner to work more effectively with patients and other health care professionals.

3 credits, Prerequisites: W-4101, W-4102, W-4103.

 

W-5203 Biomedical Diagnostics and Laboratory Tests

This course covers basic history taking and physical examination techniques. In addition, this course develops an understanding of the use of laboratory test data (whether done previously for a given patient or ordered specifically for the current course of treatment) as an aid in developing an appropriate plan of treatment.

3 credits, Prerequisites: W-4101, W-4102, W-4103.

 

W-5301   Biomedical Microbiology

Students will explore the classification of bacteria, viruses, fungi and other microorganisms, their physiological and biochemical features, the microorganisms that cause human diseases and the spoilage of food, and the ecological significance of bacteria in the cycle of matter.

3 credits, Prerequisites: W-4103.

 

W-5302   Diet and Nutrition

Students study the principles of nutrition and diet as understood in the West, as well as the use of vitamins, minerals and other supplements as part of a course of treatment.  The importance of various components of Chinese foods and herb-combination cooking are also discussed.

1 credit, Prerequisites: None

 

W-5303 Case Management and Referral

This course covers the ways in which students will meet the challenges and accountabilities of case management and referral in the 21st century practice of Traditional Chinese Medicine within the modern health care system. Students will become familiar with effective methods for planning a course of treatment, evaluating outcomes, identifying the need for referral, the process of making successful referrals, and how to do effective case closures. Associated ethical and legal issues will also be explored.

2 credits, Prerequisites: W-4102.

 

W-6304   Biomedical Pharmacology

This course introduces students to the classifications of prescription medications, covers some common medications that patients may be taking, and the physiological mechanisms and actions of those medications.

3 credits, Prerequisites: W-5202, W-5203.

 

W-6305   Clinical Sciences and Clinical Medicine

This course is a review of internal medicine, pharmacology, neurology, surgery, obstetrics/gynecology, urology, radiology, nutrition, dermatology and sexually transmitted diseases. This course also surveys the clinical practices of specialists in various Western medical fields to familiarize students with the treatment modes of other health care practitioners.

2 credits, Prerequisites: W-4103, W-5202, W-5203, W-6304.

 

W-6306   Biomedical Toxicology

This course investigates the disciplines of toxicology and pharmacology. The course explores toxicity mechanisms and the tissues affected by different classes of naturally occurring toxins. Herbs with known toxicity will be classified and their mechanisms of toxicity discussed.

2 credits, Prerequisites: W-6304, H-4101, H-4102, H-4103, H-4201.

 

W-6401   Biomedicine Review

This course is a comprehensive review of all previous biomedical courses taken at THSU, with a view to ensuring full grasp of the fundamental principles of biomedicine and their application to the successful practice of acupuncture and Traditional Chinese Medicine within a modern integrated health care system, and to prepare students more fully for their licensing and certification exams.

3 credits, Prerequisites:  W-6304.

 

W-6402   Hygiene, Public Health and Epidemiology

Students study public health issues, the formulation of laws regarding health, and the agencies established to provide disease-free food and water, adequate sanitation systems, prevention and control of epidemic and endemic diseases, and the delivery of health care to the disadvantaged.

1 credit, Prerequisites: W-4102.

 

W-6403   Biomedical Research Design and Scientific Methods

This is an introduction to the statistical methods used in biomedical research.  Students will learn the mathematical basis for modern research in biomedicine and acupuncture, Traditional Chinese Medicine, and Oriental medicine.  The course teaches the methods necessary to analyze research data with a special focus on the interpretation of results and the clinical application of data.

2 credits, Prerequisites: W-4102.

 

Clinical Training

 

C-4101   Clinic Observation and Evaluation – Black

Under the supervision and direction of the instructor, students observe licensed acupuncturists treating patients in a clinic theater setting. This provides students with a clinical context that balances the intensely didactic and theory-oriented first and second year programs.

3 credits, Prerequisite: A-4101, A-4104, A-4106, W-4101, W-4103.

 

C-4201   Clinic Observation and Evaluation – White

Under the supervision and direction of the instructor, students observe licensed acupuncturists treating patients with complex conditions in a clinical theater setting.  Students will prepare to pass the five-part examination required for promotion to clinic internship.  Students will register for and take the Clean Needle Technique course if they have not already done so.

3 credits, Prerequisites: A-4101, A-4104, A-4106, W-4101, W-4103

 

C-5202, C-5203   Clinic Internship I, Clinic Internship II

Under the supervision and direction of the instructor, students begin needling and applying other TCM treatment modalities to patients. The three emphases of Clinic Internship are: (1) the interaction between the student practitioner and the patient, (2) the development of a responsible treatment plan, and (3) the practical application of basic treatment skills and techniques. Students will further develop their diagnostic skills and gain experience in syndrome identification and formula application. Students will discuss cases with classmates and with the instructor. Students will be assigned a clinic schedule in accordance with their classroom schedules.  The internship phase of training is the culmination of the entire program of study and is designed to produce fully qualified professional practitioners.

240 Clinic contact hours/8 credits, Prerequisites:  C-4101, C-4201, CNT, Promotion Exam to Internship

 

C-5301, C-6302   Clinic Internship III, Clinic Internship IV

Under the supervision and direction of the instructor, students begin needling and applying other TCM treatment modalities to patients. The three emphases of Clinic Internship are: (1) the interaction between the student practitioner and the patient, (2) the development of a responsible treatment plan, and (3) the practical application of basic treatment skills and techniques. Students will further develop their diagnostic skills and gain experience in syndrome identification and formula application. Students will discuss cases with classmates and with the instructor. Students will be assigned a clinic schedule in accordance with their classroom schedules.  The internship phase of training is the culmination of the entire program of study and is designed to produce fully qualified professional practitioners.

240 Clinic contact hours/8 credits, Prerequisites:  C-5202, C-5203,, CNT*

 

C-6303, C-6403   Clinic Internship V, Clinic Internship VI

Under the supervision and direction of the instructor, students apply acupuncture, herbs, and other TCM treatment modalities to patients. The three emphases of Clinic Internship are: (1) the interaction between the student practitioner and the patient, (2) the development of a responsible treatment plan, and (3) the practical application of basic treatment skills and techniques. Students will further develop their diagnostic skills and gain experience in syndrome identification and formula application. Students may be asked to mentor a junior intern.  Students will discuss cases with classmates and with the instructor.  Students will be assigned a clinic schedule in accordance with their classroom schedules.  The internship phase of training is the culmination of the entire program of study and is designed to produce fully qualified professional practitioners.  The internship phase of training is the culmination of the entire program of study and is designed to produce fully qualified professional practitioners.

240 Clinic contact hours/8 credits, Prerequisites:  C-5301, C-6302, CNT*

 

CNT

The Clean Needle Technique class is offered through CCAOM and made available to our students at various times. The Clean Needle Technique (CNT) course is a one-day program that includes a lecture, a demonstration, and written and practical examinations. The content of the CNT course provides a uniform standard of practice for acupuncture in the United States and is required before students may enroll in clinic internship.

 

Ethics, Business and Communications

E-4101    Medical Ethics

This course focuses on the scope of practice of Texas-licensed acupuncturists, with students familiarized with, and discussing, the laws and regulations of the State of Texas regarding the practice of acupuncture, record keeping, and confidentiality requirements.  Students will also discuss various ethical dilemmas encountered by practitioners.

1 credit, Prerequisites:  None.

 

E-4201            Marketing and Office Management

This course introduces the student to a wide variety of medical office duties that are commonly performed by the administrator or owner of a small clinic.  These duties include such marketing duties as building one’s brand, be it the practitioner himself, or the clinic he wishes to develop, professional networking, internet and social media marketing, and building loyalty and retention within a target market. Also included are office management tasks, such as office communication, medical reception tasks, document production, medical office accounting, billing procedures, appointment scheduling, medical records management, and insurance claims processing. There is a brief introduction to International Classification of Disease-10 (ICD-10) and Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) coding, bookkeeping and accounting practices.

3 credits, Prerequisites:  None

 

E-5202    Counseling and Communications

This course will help the student develop communication and counseling skills to maximize the therapeutic effect of acupuncture and herbal medicine treatments. The student will learn basic principles of counseling and communication through a process that will include discussion and role playing with a special emphasis on the development of the acupuncturist-patient relationship.

2 credits, Prerequisites:  None.

 

E-5203    Business Planning and Entrepreneurship

This course focuses on the management of a small health clinic and includes the preparation of a business plan.  Information on economics, planning, controlling finances, record keeping, legal compliance, and patient relations will be discussed in detail.

2 credits, Prerequisites: None.

 

Herbology

 

H-4101   Introduction to TCM Herbology

This is an introductory course to TCM herbology.  Students will learn the basic herbal theories and build up solid foundations for the three specific herbology courses.

1 credit, Prerequisites: A-4101.

 

H-4102   TCM Herbology – Yellow

This course builds upon the introductory course in TCM Herbology, presents various herbs by name, classification, identification, character and taste, meridian routes, dosage, indications, contraindications, preparation, scientific research and prescription examples.  Chinese herbs in the functional categories of release exterior, clear heat, and drain downward are discussed.

2 credits, Prerequisites: H-4101.

 

H-4103   TCM Herbology – Green

This course builds upon the introductory course in TCM Herbology, presents various herbs by name, classification, identification, character and taste, meridian routes, dosage, indications, contraindications, preparation, scientific research and prescription examples.  Chinese herbs in the functional categories of drain dampness, dispel wind-dampness, transform phlegm, relieve food stagnation, regulate qi and regulate blood.

3 credits, Prerequisites: H-4101.

H-4201   TCM Herbology – Red

This course builds upon the introductory course in TCM Herbology, presents various herbs by name, classification, identification, character and taste, meridian routes, dosage, indications, contra-indications, preparation, scientific research and prescription examples.  Chinese herbs to be discussed are from the functional categories of warm interior, tonify, stabilize and bind, calm the spirit, open orifices, extinguish wind, and expel parasites.

3 credits, Prerequisites: H-4101.

 

H-5202   Introduction to TCM Prescriptionology

This is an introductory course to TCM prescriptionology.  Students will learn the basic prescription theories and build up solid foundations for the three specific prescriptionology courses.

1 credit, Prerequisites: A-4114, H-4101, H-4102, H-4103, H-4201.

 

H-5203   TCM Prescriptionology – Orange

This course continues the study of the major formulas, including the herbal components, significance, explanation, indication, and clinical use.  The course addresses herbs and herbal formulas according to the following functional categories: release exterior, drain downward, and harmonize.

2 credits, Prerequisites: H-5202.

 

H-5204   TCM Prescriptionology – Blue

This course studies the major formulas, including the herbal components, significance, explanation, indication, and clinical use.  This course addresses herbs and herbal formulas according to the following functional categories: clear heat, dispel summer-heat, warm interior cold, release exterior-interior excess, tonify, and stabilize and bind.

2 credits, Prerequisites: H-5202.

 

H-5301   TCM Prescriptionology – Purple

This course builds upon the introductory course in Prescriptionology and presents major formulas in Traditional Chinese Medicine, including the herbal components, significance, explanation, indication and clinical use. This course covers selected herbal formula according to the treatment principles of calm the spirit, open the sensory orifices, regulate qi, invigorate the blood, stop bleeding, expel wind, treat dryness, expel dampness, dispel phlegm, reduce food stagnation, expel parasites, and treat abscesses and sores.

3 credits, Prerequisites: H-5202.

 

H-6302   Classics I: Shang Han Lun

The Treatise on Febrile Disease Caused by Cold, written by Dr. Zhang Zhongjing (150 A.D. – 219 A.D.) is considered one of the classic medical texts in the field of Chinese medicine.  This text is remarkable for the detail in which febrile disease is discussed and the elegance of its formulas, many of which are in wide use today for a variety of diseases.  This text richly illustrates the flexibility of herbal therapy to address individual variations of disease, and when studied can offer much guidance in the use of formulas and how to modify them to suit an individual patient.

2 credits, Prerequisites: H-5202.

 

H-6303   Clinical Patent Herbs

This is a practical course in which the most commonly used herbal formulas in patent form are presented. The students will learn how to use and combine herbal patent medicines according to the differentiation of syndromes. Students learn methods of herbal formulation, preparation and application, as well as modification and preservation.

1 credit, Prerequisites: H-4101, H-4102, H-4103, H-4201.

 

H-6304   Practical Training in Herbal Formulation

This course is an in-depth study in the practical formulation of herbs.  Students will be involved in the formulation of herbal treatments for patients’ ailments under the guidance of the instructor.

1 credit, Prerequisites: H-5203, H-5204, H-5301.

 

H-6305   Internal Medicine – Herbology

This course will introduce students to TCM internal medicine.  Using the fundamental knowledge of TCM, students will gain a systematic knowledge of disease, its development, treatment, prognosis, and prevention.  The treatment modality we will use to address these diseases in this class is herbology.

3 credits, Prerequisites: H-5203, H-5204, H-5301.

 

H-6306   TCM Gynecology

This course explores the application of TCM herbal methodologies to gynecological issues and disorders, including menstruation, leukorrhea, pregnancy and post-partum disorders, and menopause.

2 credits, Prerequisites: H-5203 H-5204, H-5301.

 

H-6307   Classics II: The Golden Chamber

This course introduces the student to the great classic of herbal therapy by Dr. Zhang Zhongjing, The Jin Kui Yao Lueh, or “A Glimpse of the Golden Chamber.”  Students will gain insight into the treatment of internal diseases with herbal therapy.  Various syndromes are described and many formulas discussed in this text are still used commonly today.  The basic concepts of diseases and treatments and Zhang’s great contributions after “Nei Jing” are discussed here.

1 credit, Prerequisites: H-5202.

 

3206-H   Licensure Examination Preparation: Herbology

The entire study of Chinese herbology will be reviewed and discussed.  Specific study assignments will be oriented towards preparing the students to pass the national Chinese herbology certification examination.

3 credits, Prerequisites:  H-6305, H-6306.

 

3214-H   Classics IV: Wen Bing Lun

This course familiarizes students with the theories of the Warm Disease School developed as an independent diagnostic system in the Qing Dynasty.  The etiological and pathological principles of Warm Disease Theory (Febrile Disease due to heat or infection) will be addressed.

1 credit, Prerequisites: H-5202.

 

3215-H   Classics III: Four Streams of Scholars (Jin-Yuan Dynasty)

This class addresses the four schools of 13th century Chinese medical thought: the Cooling School as taught by Liu, WanSu; the Purging School as taught by Zhang, CongZheng; the Nourishing Earth School as taught by Li, Dongyuan; and the Nourishing Yin School as taught by Zhu, Danxi. These schools continue to influence the TCM practice of acupuncture and herbology, making them an important component of a modern education in Traditional Chinese Medicine.

1 credit, Prerequisites: H-5202.

 

Elective Courses

 Students are encouraged to take concentration courses in one or more specialties within Traditional Chinese Medicine. Courses may not be offered every trimester. Student recommendations for additional classes are always welcome.

O-5001   Tai Chi: 108 Wu Tai Chi Chuan 1

This course includes an introduction to the philosophy and principles of Tai Chi, and application of its relationship to health, wellbeing, meditation, self-awareness, relaxation, balance and harmony. Basic Tai Chi patterns and techniques will be taught.

1 credit, Prerequisites: None.

 

O-5002   Tai Chi: Wu Tai Chi Chuan 2

This class further develops the student’s grasp of Tai Chi techniques and is designed to deepen students’ understanding of the principles of Tai Chi within the larger context of cardiovascular fitness and health.

1 credit, Prerequisites: None.

 

O-6003   TCM Pediatrics

This course will explore the principles, practice and clinical techniques involved in pediatric medicine, discussing the herbal prescriptions, dosaging, special acupuncture techniques, qi-gong massage (acupressure), dietary, and other treatments for many common childhood disorders.

2 credits, Prerequisites: A-4110, A-5204 and H-6305.

 

O-6004   TCM Neurology

Neurology is one of the major parts of acupuncture science. This course provides the students with the basic and useful knowledge of neurology in medical Chinese such as basic diagnosis and treatment method for neuropathy. Students will also learn useful skills of clinical methods of neurology.

2 credits, Prerequisites: A-4110, A-5204 and H-6305.

 

O-6005   TCM Dermatology

The students will learn the general introduction of TCM Dermatology, including TCM physiology, pathology, differentiation of syndromes, as well as the treatment of common skin diseases with acupuncture, herbs and other TCM modalities. Student learning outcomes will include a systematic knowledge of Traditional Chinese Medicine theories, philosophies, and practices.

2 credits, Prerequisites: A-4110, A-5204 and H-6305.

 

O-6006   TCM Facial Rejuvenation

This course is a study of the combination of Traditional Chinese Medicine herbs and physical protocols (acupuncture, guasha, and acupressure) in response to the signs of aging, including TCM facial diagnosis and an introduction to traditional Chinese face reading.

1 credit, Prerequisites: A-4103, A-4104, A-4105, A-4107, A-4110, A-4113, A-4201, and C-4202.

 

O-6007   TCM for Side Effects of Western Medicine

The course discusses treatment of common side effects associated with various medications. Students learn how to provide relief for these side effects without causing further complications.

2 credits, Prerequisites: A-4110, A-5204 and H-6305.

 

O-6008   TCM Sports Medicine

This course covers the Traditional Chinese Medicine techniques peculiar to treatment of trauma including prevention and treatment of various types of sports and athletic injuries, with thorough discussion of post-recovery conditioning and therapies.

2 credit, Prerequisites: A-4110, A-5204 and H-6305.

 

O-6009   TCM Geriatrics

TCM Geriatrics is considered a sub-specialty of TCM internal medicine and gynecology that focuses on health care of elderly people. It aims to promote health maintenance and disease or disability prevention and treatment in older adults through Chinese medical practices, such as acupuncture, herbs, and dietary therapy. Longevity and improvement of quality of life in a TCM way will also be discussed in this course.

1 credit, Prerequisites: A-4110, A-5204 and H-6305.

 

O-6010   TCM for Modern Conditions

This is a clinical course to introduce TCM treatment for some modern conditions such as: smoking, drug addiction and obesity.

2 credits, Prerequisites: A-4110, A-5204 and H-6305.

 

O-6011   Fluid Physiology & Pathology

This course instructs students how to delve deeply into the principles, practice and clinical utility of fluid mechanics within the human body from the perspective of Traditional Chinese Medicine. The course will also discuss in detail the herbal, acupuncture, and other treatments for such disorders.

2 credits, Prerequisites: A-4101, A-4106, A-4108, and A-4114.

 
  

 

Tuition and Fees

 

Tuition

Item Amount
Classroom Tuition (Per Credit Hour)$350.00 (For U.S. Students)
Classroom Tuition (Per Credit Hour)$550.00 (For international students)
Clinic Tuition (Per Credit Hour)$510.00 (For both U.S. and international students)
Ten trimesters is the recommended schedule for this program of study.
Full-time students usually take 15-17 credit hours per trimester.

One-Time Fees

ItemAmount
Application Fee (Non-Refundable)
U.S. Students $75.00
International Students $150.00
International Student Foreign Transcript Evaluation Fee $200.00
Trimester Deposit $250.00
(Applicable toward first trimester tuition)
Transfer Credit Fee (Per Credit Hour) $25.00
Herbal Sample Kit $170.00
White Coat Fee $39.00
Comprehensive Exam (second year)$50.00
Graduation Fee $150.00

Recurring Fees

Item Amount
Student Services Fee $110.00
(Including facility, lab, wifi, library, tutoring, administrative services…etc.) per trimester
Textbooks, professional equipment, clinic supplies (estimate)
per trimester
$500.00
Internship: (Interns only)
per trimester
(This fee pays for expendable supplies in the clinic as well as cleaning and waste disposal. This fee applies when the student takes Clinic Internship.)
$95.00
Malpractice Insurance
per trimester
(This fee must be paid by students in the intern clinic in order to treat patients.)
$95.00

Payment Plan Fee

The payment plan allows students to divide the total tuition and fees for each trimester into four equal payments. The first payment is due by the 1st day of class. The rest of the payments are due the first day of each month afterward. Fees are incorporated into the student’s initial payment. This is the only payment plan currently available. Late payments on this plan will incur additional fees.$25.00
per trimester

Late Fees and Penalties

Item Amount
Late Registration
(Payable if classes are not registered at least one week before the start of each trimester. Does not apply to new students.)
$25.00
Late Tuition (1-15 days) $25.00
Late Tuition (16-30 days)
(After 30 days, students will be dismissed from the program unless other arrangements are made with the Registrar or President.)
$50.00
Late Fee for Payment Plan
(Payable if payment(s) made under the Payment Plan are more than 14 days late.)
$25.00
Late Add Fee
Payable if course is added after 5 days following the start of the trimester.
$25.00
per course
Late Drop Fee
Payable if course is dropped after 5 days following the start of the trimester.
$75.00
per course

Other Fees

Item Amount
Student I.D. Card (replacements) $5.00
Make-up Examinations $50.00
per exam
Intern Clinic Treatment Fee – Student discounted rate $5.00
per treatment
Duplicate Diploma $25.00
Official Transcripts
Transcripts will be provided upon receipt of a signed, written request and a fee of $15.00 each, provided all financial obligations have been met.
$15.00
Library Fees
(All fees for late returns, lost books, print and copy services are detailed in the library manual. Fines and penalties must be paid prior to registration.)
Varies

***PLEASE NOTE***THSU reserves the right to make adjustments to tuition and fees that reflect changes in the cost of living and education, subject to governing board approval.

Optional Dual Degree Program

THSU students have an opportunity to earn a Master of Acupuncture and Tui Na in China, along with the eligibility to receive a licensed endorsement to practice acupuncture in China.  Federal Financial Aid is not available for this option.